Similarities Between Reformation And Scientific Revolution Essay

Protestant Reformation And Scientific Revolution Essay

I feel that both the Protestant Reformation and the Scientific Revolution have had an equal influence on the religious nature of Europe in 1500 to 1800. But I also am convinced that the Scientific Revolution had a longer lasting influence in Europe. The Reformation destroyed the unity of faith and religious organization of the Christian peoples of Europe, cut many millions off from the true Catholic Church, and robbed them of the greatest portion of the valuable means for the cultivation and maintenance of the supernatural life. Immeasurable harm was thus created from the religious standpoint. The false fundamental principle of justification by faith alone, taught by the Reformers, produced a regrettable shallowness in religious life. Passion for good works disappeared, the simplicity which the Church had practiced from her foundation was despised, charitable and religious objects were no longer properly cultivated, supernatural interests fell into the background, and naturalistic aspirations aiming at the purely ordinary, became widespread. The denial of the Divinely instituted authority of the Church, both as regards doctrine and religious government, opened wide the door to every strangeness, gave rise to the endless division into sects and the never-ending disputes characteristic of Protestantism, and could not but lead to the complete unbelief which necessarily arises from the Protestant principles. Of real freedom of belief among the Reformers of the sixteenth century there was not a trace; on the contrary, the representatives of the Reformation displayed the greatest tyranny in matters of conscience. Thus arose from the very beginning the various Protestant "national Churches", which are entirely discordant with the Christian universalism of the Catholic Church, and depend, alike for their faith and organization, on the will of the secular ruler. In this way the Reformation was a chief factor in the evolution of royal absolutism. In every land in which it found ingress, the Reformation was the cause of indescribable suffering among the people; it occasioned civil wars which lasted decades with all their horrors and devastations; the people were oppressed and enslaved; countless treasures of art and priceless manuscripts were destroyed; between members of the same land and race the seed of discord was sown. Germany in particular, the original home of the Reformation, was...

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...Essay (20 pts) To some extent I would consider today's day and age a period of renaissance, reformation, and scientificrevolution. Each of these three topics can be compared in some way. However, they all also differ in some way. There are specific examples of each of these things during the renaissance period and today. The word renaissance means rebirth. In the 1300s to the 1500s, the renaissance was known as a time of creativity and change in many areas. For example, involving things political, social, economical, and cultural. During this time, people changed the way they viewed the world and themselves. Many new ideas sparked in the renaissance period. These ideas varied from people exploring the world, a golden age in art, playwrights, a printing revolution, and Italian renaissance writers. As an example of the golden age in art, many artists used new aspects of art such as perspective, realism, lighting and shadowing, symmetry, humanism, individualism and more. I would not necessarily say that today's day and age is like this though. The renaissance period was a time of rebirth after the dark ages. However, we currently do not have something we needed to rebirth from. Still, there are constantly new ideas about many different topics from technology to home remedies. This happens without the need of a new age from a time that was dark and depressing. The reformation during the renaissance...

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